2Toms FootShield: The Reviews are in!

2Toms FootShield: The Reviews are in!

photo: Amy, livinglifetruth.com

2Toms FootShield:

Real World Athletes Put It To The Test

“Go Longer, Finish Stronger”, “Shield Yourself”,  “Products that keep people moving”. Medi-Dyne and 2Toms have had many mission statements when it comes to creating products for athletes. But none of these phrases are as important as what real life athletes are saying about our newest product, 2Toms FootShield. We partnered with BibRave and it’s team of BibRave Pros to see what runners, yogis, dancers, dads, moms and people just like you had to say. Read their rave reviews below!

” I’m extremely impressed with this product. My feet and toes are very impressed and are much happier with this experience. For someone who has struggled with blisters, excessive sweating/moisture in my feet, strong foot odor (the odor of effort) and athlete’s foot, to be able to prevent and keep all that away is remarkable. I think the product gives me more confidence when running/walking, makes me more surefooted, and helps me thrive better in my very active athletic lifestyle.” – Jeremy runninggrooveshark.com


” I have put 2Toms FootShield to the test over the past month and this roll-on works as a perspiration barrier for my feet and helps keep them dry and odor free! FootShield has replaced my “baby powder therapy” by using a blend of natural antifungal, ingredients and moisturizers reduce and prevent sweaty feet, the growth of bacteria, athlete’s foot, blisters, and smelly shoes.” – Amy livinglifetruth.com


“I had some athletes foot going on my feet prior to starting out with 2Toms FootShield. I have started to use FootShield before every run, and the athletes foot had cleared up.  At one point, I forgot to apply my FootShield on for a couple of days in a row, and it came back.  Can’t let that happen again.  I got back to my routine right away after I realized it was coming back.” – Mark daddydidyouwin.wordpress.com

“I learned from trying it out that it’s great for applying before a run or workout, as well as after. I like rolling it onto my feet before I put on my flip flops. It keeps my feet drier in the crazy Florida humidity. I toss FootShield into my post-run recovery bag so that I can put some on my feet when I take off my running shoes. It feels refreshing on my tired feet. Bottom line is, FootShield is a product you will want to check out for yourself. 2Toms makes the highest quality products for endurance athletes and it shows.” – Shannon girlsgotsole.com


We’re thrilled to hear so many runners are loving drier feet, fresh fragrance, natural oils and antifungal treatment of FootShield! Happy feet make for happy runners! Give FootShield a try today.

ROW TO RIO: 2016 Rowing Team O’Leary/Tomek


Rio De Janeiro 2016. It’s on the mind of every Team USA member competing there this August. In particular, this is what’s on the mind of Team USA rowers Meghan O’Leary and Ellen Tomek. For an Olympian, the road to the games in Rio is a long one full of bumps, twists, and turns. Meghan and Ellen were kind enough to spend a few minutes away from their training in Princeton, New Jersey to talk with us on the phone. Between talking about some of the controversy surrounding this year’s games, understanding the struggles of being an elite rower in the US, and learning their backgrounds, there was plenty to talk about. Here are some of the highlights of the conversation:

How did you guys get started in rowing?

Ellen: “I started rowing at the University of Michigan my freshman year as a walk-on athlete. I went to a tryout where they tested our fitness and rowing potential. I made the cut, stuck with it and eventually was put on scholarship.”

Meghan: “Ellen basically came straight here to the Princeton Training Center right after college. I had a little bit of a different path; I played volleyball and softball at the University of Virginia. I graduated and went to work full time with ESPN. It was a couple years later when I had just moved to Connecticut. I wanted to do something new and ended up just Googling rowing. This was about six years ago, the summer of 2010. I literally didn’t know anything about the sport. They have a great rowing program at the University of Virginia and ironically, the head rowing coach had actually approached me while I was still at school and said ‘hey, you should try rowing.’ I think it kind of planted the seed. So I signed up for some learn-to-row sessions, absolutely fell in love with it, and I haven’t looked back since. I threw myself into it and managed to find myself at the National Training Center a little over a year later, in fall 2011.”

2016_OlympicTrialsFinishLine2016_OlympicTrialsFinishLine –
Team O’Leary/Tomek crossing the finish line at trials (Courtesy of USRowing)

When did you know you were good enough?

Ellen: “I made the Beijing Olympic Team in 2008, just two years out of college. The first year that I was training with the squad I made the 2007 National Team. I ended up in the women’s double for the 2008 Olympics and 2009 National Team. After that, I was injured for quite a bit and ended up missing out on the London Games, but decided that I wasn’t done training. Once Meghan and I started rowing together in 2013, we knew we had potential and could be competitive internationally. We made it our goal to develop the boat together over the course of the full quadrennial. Even back when we started rowing together, three and half years ago, we always believed we had the potential to go to Rio and to win a medal.”

How many women were you competing against during trials?

Meghan: “The women’s double is a Trials boat, which means it is an open event and anyone can enter. It’s interesting and unique to the sport of rowing. Over the last few years there have been a variety of competitors and contenders trying to win the double and represent the United States in that boat. We have represented the United States in the women’s double since 2013. We may have been considered the favorites going in, but there were definitely a lot of great athletes there. There were seven other crews that we were competing against us for the right to represent the United States as the Olympic Women’s Double in Rio. It definitely wasn’t a sure thing going into the regatta, so we were nervous and are very proud of what we accomplished.”

Where does the money in the sport of rowing come from domestically and internationally?

Ellen: “We are supported by non-profit organizations, USRowing and the USOC. We earn a modest monthly living stipend that maybe covers rent and groceries. The lack of funding is in part due to rowing not being a mainstream sport, so there’s not as much visibility.”

Meghan: “Rowers are superstars in Great Britain, New Zealand, and many European countries. Several of those athletes make real salaries and have endorsements and sponsorships. They are sort of like the equivalent of the NBA and NFL stars we have here in the U.S. In many countries outside of the U.S., rowers can keep rowing for much longer because of the income potential, whereas here in the States it can be difficult to maintain a long career in the sport due solely to the need to support yourself and your family.”

Are you nervous about going to Rio for the obvious reasons?

Meghan: “You prepare for so long and train so hard that you want to be able to show up to the Olympics and perform at your highest level. You put in all these hours and then be faced with something you can’t control like the water quality or Zika, is frustrating but we can’t dwell on it. It’s scary, but the best thing we’re trying to do is not stress about it and prepare in the best ways we can: lots of bug spray, long sleeves, and minimizing exposure to the water, all that stuff. It’s funny how some people have asked “Well, did you ever consider not going to Rio?” and we of course, answer ‘absolutely not!’ You don’t put your whole life into this only to say ‘no, thanks.’

Medi-Dyne-Wristband-Photo-web-300x225Medi-Dyne Wristband Photo-web
Our employees are happy to have something they can wear to show their support for team O’Leary/Tomek!!

Getting to know these Olympians was an awesome experience. Medi-Dyne is proud to have Ellen Tomek and Meghan O’Leary as Athlete Ambassadors. Medi-Dyne wishes team O’Leary/Tomek the best of luck in the Rio games!! Go Team USA!

Be sure to tune your TV to the Olympic Rowing Event on August 6-13 to cheer on Meghan, Ellen and Team USA!

6 Things the Happiest Runners Don’t Do

6 Things the Happiest Runners Don’t Do

Are you a happy runner?

Lately, I haven’t been. And I’ve been trying to figure out how to get my love for the run back.

I’ve read a lot of running books, thousands of blog posts about running, training books, and I’ve listened to hours of podcasts and I’ve seen all the running movies. After all of that, I’ve picked up on a few things that I do that runners who seem the happiest don’t do. Here they are:

1. Think Too Much

Happy runners just go on their run. They don’t think about what time it is in the morning. They don’t worry if they’ve created the right playlist. They don’t care if they match their outfit. They just go running.


2. Schedule Runs

The happiest runners go when they have the time. Running is their hobby. And who schedules hobbies? Sure, they may have a habit of running early in the morning or late at night, but it’s not written down on their calendar. They throw on their shoes and go when they feel like they just gotta go for a run. Have you ever noticed how when you schedule something, it becomes just another item on a to-do list? Should running be more like homework or a hobby?


3. Use Social Media Mileage Apps

The happiest runners don’t upload their milea

ge because they don’t need feedback on their run. They don’t need other people to tell them how badass they are because they got up at 4:30 a.m. and ran 20 miles on a Tuesday. Just doing it is enough.


4. Stare at their Watch

Happy runners don’t wear GPS watches.


Me (red skirt) and a group of running buddies during 2012's Virtual Run for Sherry.

Me (red skirt) and a group of running buddies

5. Race All the Time

A lot of runners race (even happy ones). And they have a ton of fun racing (myself included), but the happiest runners don’t need to race. They run for the love of running. They just run because it clears their mind. Or they want to be out in nature. Or it helps them think better.




6. Run for Fitness

This was the reason I started running and now that I’ve achieved my goal, I’m left feeling a little empty. For me, the point of running was to burn more calories. But that’s not the point. The happiest runners get out there because they love the feeling they get from running.

What do you think? What else don’t happy runners do?

A Workout Tip Coffee-Drinkers Will Love

A Workout Tip Coffee-Drinkers Will Love

Jillian Michaels said on her podcast recently that caffeine can help boost your athletic performance. Although, I should note that she doesn’t like the idea of getting your caffeine from coffee, but rather a supplement that also contains antioxidants and that helps slow the absorption of the caffeine in your system.

In the book, The Metabolic Effect Diet, the authors suggest that, for some people, a cup of coffee a half an hour before a workout can help improve workouts.

"Coffee" (c) 2005 by Timothy Boyd, under a CC Attributions: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en

“Coffee” (c) 2005 by Timothy Boyd, under a CC Attributions: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en

I will find any reason to have a cup of coffee during the day, so I wanted to know more.

But wait. Isn’t coffee dehydrating? That is a myth, according to Nancy Clark, M.S., R.D., who wrote an article, “The Facts About Caffeine and Athletic Performance,” for Active.com. So that’s good. But how does it help improve a workout?

In her article, she says there have been a lot of good studies on this topic, and that most of them conclude that caffeine helps improve athletic performance, and even makes the effort seem easier.

“The average improvement in performance is about 12 percent,” she writes, “with more benefits noticed during endurance exercise than with shorter exercise (eight to 20 minutes) and a negligible amount for sprinters.”

She also said more benefits have been noticed in athletes that rarely drink coffee. Darn.

By the way, coffee and caffeine react differently for everyone. Definitely experiment with caffeine in training, not on race morning. And use common sense when it comes to caffeine consumption, advises Clark. More caffeine is not better. Remember: If you choose to get your caffeine from coffee, steer clear of specialty coffees (i.e. lattes).

So, how much caffeine should you take if you want to enhance your workout?

“A moderate caffeine intake is considered to be 250 mg/day. In research studies, the amount of caffeine that enhances performance ranges from 1.5 to 4 mg/pound body weight (3 to 9 mg/kg) taken one hour before exercise. For a 150-pound person, this comes to about 225 to 600 mg.” (There’s about 200 mg of caffeine in a 16-ounce cup of Starbucks coffee, for reference.)

Let me know if you use caffeine in your workout? How has it helped you?

How to Get that Stinky Smell Out of Shoes and Sports Gear

How to Get that Stinky Smell Out of Shoes and Sports Gear

Well, it’s fall and back-to-school time! And, if you are a parent (or if you are reading this and are in school, yourself), then you know it’s also back-to-sports time.

You also know that means it is back to washing some seriously stinky socks and uniforms, and dealing with smelly shoes and sports gear.  Ugh!

You don’t have to have a child in sports, though. My kindergartner comes home with some pretty stinky feet after wearing his shoes all day, playing on the playground and riding on the hot bus.

You don’t want your house smelling like a locker room. And you don’t want to send your child to his or her game with stinky gear. Washing uniforms and socks is easier, of course, since you can throw them in the wash.

(Click here to learn more about Stink Free Sports Detergent.)

But what to do about the stuff you can’t throw in the washing machine? Getting the odor out of running shoes, or off of soccer shin guards or hockey pads seems more difficult.

That’s exactly why 2Toms created Stink Free Spray.

Stink Free is a shoe deodorizer that also works on sports gear and even in gym bags and lockers. You can spray it on anything that is hard to wash.

It’s safe to use on leather, canvas, satin and denim shoes, in work or riding boots, on hockey and football pads, in helmets, and on motorcycle gear—anything that smells, really.

Stink Free Spray uses a formula that doesn’t just mask the odors caused by sweat, it completely eliminates it.  And Stink Free does not use perfume in its formula. Once the spray dries, there is no smell at all.

If you’ve ever thrown something out, or thought about throwing something out, because it smelled and you didn’t know how to wash it, then you definitely need to try this.

For example, let’s say your husband wore his expensive fur-lined Crocs on a hot day in the summer…with no socks on. Just a hypothetical. But you’ll be glad you have some of 2Toms’s Stink Free Spray.

Go here to learn more and read more about Stink Free Spray.

Training for Hikers – Where to Start

Fall is just around the corner and is a beautiful time for hiking!

But remember, just like training for a marathon or a triathlon, or any physical endeavor really, new hikers–like me–need to start slow and build.

Training for a hike, whether it’s 5 miles or 50, involves increasing both cardio and strength endurance over time. Proper training will ensure you have more fun on your hike! Plus, training for a hike will help reduce soreness and decrease your chances of getting injured!

Read more about common hiking injuries and prevention at the 2Toms Knowledge Base.

Cardiovascular Training for Hikers

In the article, “Make Hiking More Fun,” at Prevention.com, the authors suggest at least 3-4 weeks to train for a 5-mile hike, and longer (6-8 weeks) if you don’t already exercise regularly.

Prevention.com’s fitness advisor Wayne L. Westcott, PhD, suggests walking 30-45 minutes at least 3 days per week (to train for a 5-mile hike). “On a fourth day, do a longer walk, preferably outside on hilly terrain,” advises Westcott. “Each week, increase the long walk until you’re doing at least two-thirds of the distance of your first hike (about 31/2 miles if you’ll be hiking 5 miles).

But it’s okay to train on a treadmill, if that’s all you can do. Click the link for Arizona personal trainer James Fisher’s 4-week treadmill training plan to get you ready for a long hike on Shape.com.

Strength Training for Hikers

Strength training will help you avoid injury and decrease post-hike soreness.

Work on strengthening muscles around the core (back, abs, glutes), and the muscles that surround your ankles and knees. Try to make strength a priority 2-3 days per week.

Prevention.com’s Westcott offers a detailed strength routine that includes one-legged squats, step-ups/step-downs, shrugs and back extensions. Click this link for descriptions of each exercise.

Check out another sample strength training routine from the Washington Trails Association.

Rest & Recovery

Like any exercise routine, make sure you get a day or two of complete rest. Muscles need time to recover and build so you can get stronger!

Stretch after training walks or hikes, and after strength training. Remember: Use dynamic stretches (active stretching, such as walking, lunges, squats, etc.) to warm up, and cool down with some slow walking and a static stretching (stretching each body part and holding it for a given period of time).

Learn more about how to ease sore muscles or DOMS.

Hiking with Dogs

Want to bring your dog on your hike? Include the dog in your training. Just like humans, dogs need to start slow and build their strength and endurance. Check out this link for some tips from a long-distance hiker and Ruffwear ambassador Whitney “ALLGOOD” LaRuffa.